How to Buy a Bicycle

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  • user warning: Table './tipsformom_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<div class=\"mw-parser-output\">\n<p>Buying a bike can be overwhelming at first, especially since there are so many options out there! The good news is that once you’ve settled on what kind of bike you want to buy, this process is actually pretty straightforward—especially if you don’t have a specific brand in mind. The big thing you’ll want to consider is how you plan on using your bike, since different bikes are designed for different types of riders!\n</p>\n<h2><span class=\"mw-editsection\"><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">[</span><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=Buy-a-Bicycle&amp;action=edit&amp;section=1\" title=\"Edit section: Steps\">Edit</a><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">]</span></span><span class=\"mw-headline\" id=\"Steps\">Steps</span></h2>\n<h3><span class=\"mw-editsection\"><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">[</span><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=Buy-a-Bicycle&amp;action=edit&amp;section=2\" title=\"Edit section: How do I know what kind of bike to buy?\">Edit</a><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">]</span></span><span id=\"How-do-I-know-what-kind-of-bike-to-buy?\"></span><span class=\"mw-headline\" id=\"How-do-I-know-what-kind-of-bike-to-buy.3F\">How do I know what kind of bike to buy?</span></h3>\n<ol>\n<li>Choose a road bike if you’ll be traveling primarily on paved roads. Road bikes are designed for paved surfaces, which makes them ideal if you’re riding in a city or using the bike to get to work. They have lighter frames, slimmer tires, and they’re generally a lot easier to maneuver. If you aren’t tackling any off-road trails, get a road bike!<sup id=\"_ref-1\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 1\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-1\">[1]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 1 Version 2.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/c/c4/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-1-Version-2.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n<ul>\n<li>There are many subcategories of road bike, including cyclocross, touring, adventure road, triathlon, and fitness. If you’re going to be using the bike for a specific sport or activity, consider getting one of these specialized bikes.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li>Pick a mountain bike if you’re hitting the trails. Mountain bikes are best for riding on rocky trails and adventuring off of paved roads. The tires are large and have a thicker tread, which helps to grab the surface and propel you forward when you\'re going uphill. They tend to be kind of bulky, but that helps them hold up better in rough conditions!<sup id=\"_ref-2\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 2\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-2\">[2]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-2-Version-3.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 2 Version 3.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/0/02/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-2-Version-3.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-2-Version-3.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n</li>\n<li>Look at a hybrid bike for the best of both worlds. If you want something smaller than a mountain bike, but bigger than a road bike, look into a hybrid bike. Sometimes known as “comfort” bikes, these bicycles have gears like a mountain bike, but they’re not as bulky or unwieldy. They perform well on pavement, but you can also ride them on smoother dirt paths.<sup id=\"_ref-3\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 3\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-3\">[3]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-3-Version-3.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 3 Version 3.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/a/a5/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-3-Version-3.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-3-Version-3.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n<ul>\n<li>These bikes are called “comfort” bikes because they usually have wider, padded saddles and suspension systems to absorb the shock of potholes or bumps. This generally makes them super comfortable to ride.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li>Consider an electric bike if you want some help pedaling. Electric bikes have a built-in battery that help you pedal with ease (or skip the pedaling altogether!). This is ideal if you don’t care about the fitness component, or you have some kind of chronic knee pain that makes riding a standard bike difficult.<sup id=\"_ref-4\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 4\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-4\">[4]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-4-Version-3.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 4 Version 3.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/1/13/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-4-Version-3.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-4-Version-3.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n<ul>\n<li>These bikes do tend to be kind of pricey. A decent electric bike will run you $2,000-3,000. They’re also pretty bulky, so they tend to require a lot of storage space.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n</ol>\n<h3><span class=\"mw-editsection\"><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">[</span><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=Buy-a-Bicycle&amp;action=edit&amp;section=3\" title=\"Edit section: Is it better to buy a used or new bike?\">Edit</a><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">]</span></span><span id=\"Is-it-better-to-buy-a-used-or-new-bike?\"></span><span class=\"mw-headline\" id=\"Is-it-better-to-buy-a-used-or-new-bike.3F\">Is it better to buy a used or new bike?</span></h3>\n<ol>\n<li>Pick a new bike if you want durability and have unique requirements. If you’ve got your heart set on getting a specific type of bike and you know it’s the one for you, it’s probably better to buy new since you won’t need to replace it for a long time. Buying new is also a good idea if you really don’t want any headaches in the maintenance and repair department, since you won’t need to replace any components any time soon.<sup id=\"_ref-5\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 5\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-5\">[5]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-5-Version-3.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 5 Version 3.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/7/71/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-5-Version-3.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-5-Version-3.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n<ul>\n<li>Every bike will need maintenance eventually. Don’t buy a brand new bike and expect to never need a tune up!</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li>Get a used bike if you’re on a budget or just causally riding. If you’re trying to cut costs or you really don’t care all that much about your paint job being chip-free, just buy a used bike. A used bike may also be a good idea if you enjoy tinkering and fixing things yourself, since you’ll be able to replace the grip tape, chain, or tire if they break down in the future. Just be sure that you don’t buy an obviously damaged or dysfunctional bike.<sup id=\"_ref-6\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 6\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-6\">[6]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-6-Version-3.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 6 Version 3.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/b/b1/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-6-Version-3.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-6-Version-3.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n<ul>\n<li>You can buy used bikes from most bike shops, but you can also search on Craigslist or Facebook Marketplace if you spot something interesting. Just make sure that you inspect the bike carefully and test it out before you buy it!</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n</ol>\n<h3><span class=\"mw-editsection\"><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">[</span><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=Buy-a-Bicycle&amp;action=edit&amp;section=4\" title=\"Edit section: What size bike do I need for my height?\">Edit</a><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">]</span></span><span id=\"What-size-bike-do-I-need-for-my-height?\"></span><span class=\"mw-headline\" id=\"What-size-bike-do-I-need-for-my-height.3F\">What size bike do I need for my height?</span></h3>\n<ol>\n<li>Sit on the bike to see if it’s comfortable and sized appropriately. There are all kinds of <a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Size-a-Bike\" title=\"Size a Bike\">sizing methods</a> and tricks out there when it comes to figuring out if a bike is the right size for you. You can look at tube measurements and subjective size recommendations all you’d like, but so long as the bike is comfortable for you, it’s totally fine.<sup id=\"_ref-7\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 7\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-7\">[7]</a></sup> If you can keep a neutral spine and your knees are almost perfectly straight at the lowest pedal position, it’ll work for you.<sup id=\"_ref-8\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 8\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-8\">[8]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-7-Version-3.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 7 Version 3.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/9/94/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-7-Version-3.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-7-Version-3.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n<ul>\n<li>If you want to use a more scientific sizing method, you can! Here are the general recommendations for bike sizes based on your height (the bike size is the distance from the seat post to the crank):<sup id=\"_ref-9\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 9\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-9\">[9]</a></sup>\n<ul>\n<li>4\'11\" to 5\'3\" –</li>\n<li>5\'3\" to 5\'7\" –</li>\n<li>5\'7\" to 5\'11\" –</li>\n<li>6\'0\" to 6\'2\" –</li>\n<li>6\'2\" to 6\'4\" –</li>\n<li>6\'4\" or taller\" – or more</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li>Take a test drive to determine if the bike feels smooth. Once you find a bike that you think might be right for you, take it for a quick test run. Bike around the block, or in the parking lot of the bike shop. If everything feels smooth and you don’t find pedaling uncomfortable, it’s probably a solid bike for you!<sup id=\"_ref-10\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 10\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-10\">[10]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-8-Version-3.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 8 Version 3.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/8/82/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-8-Version-3.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-8-Version-3.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n<ul>\n<li>Different riders prefer different things in a bike. A large part of this process is simply determining how a bike feels to you. If you aren’t comfortable on a given bike, don’t buy it. If you’re comfortable, it’s worth considering!</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n</ol>\n<h3><span class=\"mw-editsection\"><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">[</span><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=Buy-a-Bicycle&amp;action=edit&amp;section=5\" title=\"Edit section: How much is it to buy a bike?\">Edit</a><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">]</span></span><span id=\"How-much-is-it-to-buy-a-bike?\"></span><span class=\"mw-headline\" id=\"How-much-is-it-to-buy-a-bike.3F\">How much is it to buy a bike?</span></h3>\n<ol>\n<li>A new bike is probably going to start around $300-500. Road bikes typically start around the $300 mark, while a new mountain bike is going to start around $500—at least if you’re buying a quality bike. There are bikes that are cheaper than this, but they may not last as long.<sup id=\"_ref-11\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 11\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-11\">[11]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-9-Version-3.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 9 Version 3.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/1/15/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-9-Version-3.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-9-Version-3.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n</li>\n<li>A high end bike may cost up to $2,000, or more. The really fancy bikes on the market tend to be extremely expensive.<sup id=\"_ref-12\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 12\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-12\">[12]</a></sup> Unless you’re a seasoned cyclist or you plan on entering races in the future, it’s usually not necessary to buy an expensive bike like this.<sup id=\"_ref-13\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 13\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-13\">[13]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-10-Version-2.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 10 Version 2.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/1/17/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-10-Version-2.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-10-Version-2.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n</li>\n<li>Used bike prices vary, but they may require more maintenance. If you opt for a used bike, it may require a few adjustments and repairs. You may need a new chain, a fresh saddle, and some new grip tape. You’re probably going to need a tune up relatively soon as well. Take these minor repairs into account when you’re buying a used bike, and assume you’ll end up spending a few hundred on this stuff.<sup id=\"_ref-14\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 14\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-14\">[14]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-11-Version-3.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 11 Version 3.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/6/68/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-11-Version-3.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-11-Version-3.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n</li>\n</ol>\n<h3><span class=\"mw-editsection\"><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">[</span><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=Buy-a-Bicycle&amp;action=edit&amp;section=6\" title=\"Edit section: Where should I buy a bike?\">Edit</a><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">]</span></span><span id=\"Where-should-I-buy-a-bike?\"></span><span class=\"mw-headline\" id=\"Where-should-I-buy-a-bike.3F\">Where should I buy a bike?</span></h3>\n<ol>\n<li>Most cycling enthusiasts suggest you buy in-person from a bike shop. The folks who work at bike shops are passionate and knowledgeable, and they’ll be able to advise you on what kind of bike is likely best for you. They’ll also be able to tune or adjust your bike before it leaves the shop so that you have something road-ready as soon as you walk out of the door! Regardless, if you don’t see the bike in person, there’s no way to know if it’s right for you.<sup id=\"_ref-15\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 15\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-15\">[15]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-12-Version-3.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 12 Version 3.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/6/66/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-12-Version-3.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-12-Version-3.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n<ul>\n<li>If you don’t live anywhere near a bike shop, check your local outdoors or big box department store. These big retailers often have bikes for sale.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li>Consider buying online if you want a specific model or bike. Local bike shops can only offer what they’ve got on hand, and if you know exactly what you’re looking for, they may not have it in stock. If you’ve got your eyes set on a specific brand, model, or set of features, buying online may be your best option. The big downside is that you won’t get to test the bike, but if you do your research and know what you want, that may not matter to you.<sup id=\"_ref-16\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 16\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-16\">[16]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-13-Version-3.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 13 Version 3.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/9/96/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-13-Version-3.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-13-Version-3.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n<ul>\n<li>Most online bike stores have a live chat feature. If you do buy from an online retailer, reach out through the chat function first. Let them know how tall you are, and what you want in a bike. They’ll be able to give you concrete recommendations regarding the size you likely need.<sup id=\"_ref-17\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 17\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-17\">[17]</a></sup></li>\n<li>This is also a good option if nothing catches your eye at the local bike shop but you have a solid sense for what you’re looking for.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n<li>Consider buying a used bike from a private seller to save money. If you want to buy from a private seller who lives in your area, that’s totally fine! You may not want to exchange money before you inspect it in person though, so try to meet in person to get a look at the bike. Keep in mind, since you can only go see one bike at a time, it may take you a long time to find a bike that’s right for you if you go this route.<sup id=\"_ref-18\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 18\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-18\">[18]</a></sup><br />\n<div class=\"mwimg largeimage floatcenter \" style=\"max-width:728px\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Image:Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-14-Version-3.jpg\" class=\"image\"><img alt=\"Buy a Bicycle Step 14 Version 3.jpg\" src=\"https://www.wikihow.com/images/thumb/c/cc/Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-14-Version-3.jpg/aid22958-v4-728px-Buy-a-Bicycle-Step-14-Version-3.jpg\" decoding=\"async\" width=\"728\" height=\"546\" class=\"whcdn\" /></a></div>\n<ul>\n<li>Ask the seller how long they’ve had it, why they’re getting rid of it, and what repairs it has needed in the past. If they get kind of twitchy or uncomfortable with the questions, just walk away.</li>\n</ul>\n</li>\n</ol>\n<h2><span class=\"mw-editsection\"><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">[</span><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=Buy-a-Bicycle&amp;action=edit&amp;section=7\" title=\"Edit section: Tips\">Edit</a><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">]</span></span><span class=\"mw-headline\" id=\"Tips\">Tips</span></h2>\n<ul>\n<li>If you’re short on storage space, consider buying a folding bike. As the name suggests, these can be folded up to make the bike easier to carry and store. They aren’t especially fast, but they get the job done if you don’t want a giant bike taking up tons of space in your apartment!<sup id=\"_ref-19\" class=\"reference\" aria-label=\"Link to Reference 19\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_note-19\">[19]</a></sup></li>\n</ul>\n<h2><span class=\"mw-editsection\"><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">[</span><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=Buy-a-Bicycle&amp;action=edit&amp;section=8\" title=\"Edit section: Related wikiHows\">Edit</a><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">]</span></span><span class=\"mw-headline\" id=\"Related-wikiHows\">Related wikiHows</span></h2>\n<ul>\n<li><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Build-a-Dirt-Bike-Ramp\" title=\"Build a Dirt Bike Ramp\">Build a Dirt Bike Ramp</a></li>\n<li><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Replace-a-Bicycle-Tire\" title=\"Replace a Bicycle Tire\">Replace a Bicycle Tire</a></li>\n<li><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Paint-a-Bike\" title=\"Paint a Bike\">Paint a Bike</a></li>\n<li><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Impress-Your-Friends-on-Your-Bicycle\" title=\"Impress Your Friends on Your Bicycle\">Impress Your Friends on Your Bicycle</a></li>\n<li><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/Size-a-Bike\" title=\"Size a Bike\">Size a Bike</a></li>\n</ul>\n<h2><span class=\"mw-editsection\"><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">[</span><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=Buy-a-Bicycle&amp;action=edit&amp;section=9\" title=\"Edit section: References\">Edit</a><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">]</span></span><span class=\"mw-headline\" id=\"References\">References</span></h2>\n<h2><span class=\"mw-editsection\"><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">[</span><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=Buy-a-Bicycle&amp;action=edit&amp;section=10\" title=\"Edit section: Related wikiHows\">Edit</a><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">]</span></span><span class=\"mw-headline\" id=\"Related-wikiHows_2\">Related wikiHows</span></h2>\n<h2><span class=\"mw-editsection\"><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">[</span><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"https://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=Buy-a-Bicycle&amp;action=edit&amp;section=11\" title=\"Edit section: Quick Summary\">Edit</a><span class=\"mw-editsection-bracket\">]</span></span><span class=\"mw-headline\" id=\"Quick-Summary\">Quick Summary</span></h2>\n<div class=\"mw-references-wrap mw-references-columns\">\n<ol class=\"references\">\n<li id=\"_note-1\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-1\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/bikes/buying-guide/index.htm\">https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/bikes/buying-guide/index.htm</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-2\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-2\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/bikes/buying-guide/index.htm\">https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/bikes/buying-guide/index.htm</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-3\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-3\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/bikes/buying-guide/index.htm\">https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/bikes/buying-guide/index.htm</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-4\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-4\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.wired.com/gallery/best-electric-bikes/\">https://www.wired.com/gallery/best-electric-bikes/</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-5\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-5\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/18/style/bike-buying-commute-exercise-questions.html\">https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/18/style/bike-buying-commute-exercise-questions.html</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-6\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-6\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.bikeradar.com/features/how-to-buy-a-used-or-second-hand-bike-online/\">https://www.bikeradar.com/features/how-to-buy-a-used-or-second-hand-bike-online/</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-7\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-7\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.bikeradar.com/advice/sizing-and-fit/mountain-bike-sizing-what-size-bike-do-i-need/\">https://www.bikeradar.com/advice/sizing-and-fit/mountain-bike-sizing-what-size-bike-do-i-need/</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-8\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-8\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://ilovebicycling.com/how-to-maintain-proper-cycling-posture/\">https://ilovebicycling.com/how-to-maintain-proper-cycling-posture/</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-9\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-9\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.bicycle-guider.com/bike-articles/bike-size-chart/\">https://www.bicycle-guider.com/bike-articles/bike-size-chart/</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-10\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-10\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/bikes/buying-guide/index.htm\">https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/bikes/buying-guide/index.htm</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-11\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-11\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/18/style/bike-buying-commute-exercise-questions.html\">https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/18/style/bike-buying-commute-exercise-questions.html</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-12\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-12\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/bikes/buying-guide/index.htm\">https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/bikes/buying-guide/index.htm</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-13\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-13\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/18/style/bike-buying-commute-exercise-questions.html\">https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/18/style/bike-buying-commute-exercise-questions.html</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-14\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-14\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/a20008824/how-to-buy-a-used-bike/\">https://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/a20008824/how-to-buy-a-used-bike/</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-15\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-15\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/18/style/bike-buying-commute-exercise-questions.html\">https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/18/style/bike-buying-commute-exercise-questions.html</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-16\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-16\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/a20018491/how-to-buy-a-bike-online/\">https://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/a20018491/how-to-buy-a-bike-online/</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-17\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-17\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/a20018491/how-to-buy-a-bike-online/\">https://www.bicycling.com/bikes-gear/a20018491/how-to-buy-a-bike-online/</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-18\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-18\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.bikeradar.com/features/how-to-buy-a-used-or-second-hand-bike-online/\">https://www.bikeradar.com/features/how-to-buy-a-used-or-second-hand-bike-online/</a></span>\n</li>\n<li id=\"_note-19\"><a target=\"_blank\" href=\"#_ref-19\">↑</a> <span class=\"reference-text\"><a target=\"_blank\" rel=\"nofollow noreferrer noopener\" class=\"external free\" href=\"https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/18/style/bike-buying-commute-exercise-questions.html\">https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/18/style/bike-buying-commute-exercise-questions.html</a></span>\n</li>\n</ol>\n</div>\n</div>\n', created = 1632324422, expire = 1632410822, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:d8f9b9c59155a809b1981ea12aea2a23' in /var/www/vhosts/tipsformom.com/httpdocs/includes/cache.inc on line 108.

Buying a bike can be overwhelming at first, especially since there are so many options out there! The good news is that once you’ve settled on what kind of bike you want to buy, this process is actually pretty straightforward—especially if you don’t have a specific brand in mind. The big thing you’ll want to consider is how you plan on using your bike, since different bikes are designed for different types of riders!

[Edit]Steps

[Edit]How do I know what kind of bike to buy?

  1. Choose a road bike if you’ll be traveling primarily on paved roads. Road bikes are designed for paved surfaces, which makes them ideal if you’re riding in a city or using the bike to get to work. They have lighter frames, slimmer tires, and they’re generally a lot easier to maneuver. If you aren’t tackling any off-road trails, get a road bike![1]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 1 Version 2.jpg
    • There are many subcategories of road bike, including cyclocross, touring, adventure road, triathlon, and fitness. If you’re going to be using the bike for a specific sport or activity, consider getting one of these specialized bikes.
  2. Pick a mountain bike if you’re hitting the trails. Mountain bikes are best for riding on rocky trails and adventuring off of paved roads. The tires are large and have a thicker tread, which helps to grab the surface and propel you forward when you're going uphill. They tend to be kind of bulky, but that helps them hold up better in rough conditions![2]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 2 Version 3.jpg
  3. Look at a hybrid bike for the best of both worlds. If you want something smaller than a mountain bike, but bigger than a road bike, look into a hybrid bike. Sometimes known as “comfort” bikes, these bicycles have gears like a mountain bike, but they’re not as bulky or unwieldy. They perform well on pavement, but you can also ride them on smoother dirt paths.[3]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 3 Version 3.jpg
    • These bikes are called “comfort” bikes because they usually have wider, padded saddles and suspension systems to absorb the shock of potholes or bumps. This generally makes them super comfortable to ride.
  4. Consider an electric bike if you want some help pedaling. Electric bikes have a built-in battery that help you pedal with ease (or skip the pedaling altogether!). This is ideal if you don’t care about the fitness component, or you have some kind of chronic knee pain that makes riding a standard bike difficult.[4]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 4 Version 3.jpg
    • These bikes do tend to be kind of pricey. A decent electric bike will run you $2,000-3,000. They’re also pretty bulky, so they tend to require a lot of storage space.

[Edit]Is it better to buy a used or new bike?

  1. Pick a new bike if you want durability and have unique requirements. If you’ve got your heart set on getting a specific type of bike and you know it’s the one for you, it’s probably better to buy new since you won’t need to replace it for a long time. Buying new is also a good idea if you really don’t want any headaches in the maintenance and repair department, since you won’t need to replace any components any time soon.[5]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 5 Version 3.jpg
    • Every bike will need maintenance eventually. Don’t buy a brand new bike and expect to never need a tune up!
  2. Get a used bike if you’re on a budget or just causally riding. If you’re trying to cut costs or you really don’t care all that much about your paint job being chip-free, just buy a used bike. A used bike may also be a good idea if you enjoy tinkering and fixing things yourself, since you’ll be able to replace the grip tape, chain, or tire if they break down in the future. Just be sure that you don’t buy an obviously damaged or dysfunctional bike.[6]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 6 Version 3.jpg
    • You can buy used bikes from most bike shops, but you can also search on Craigslist or Facebook Marketplace if you spot something interesting. Just make sure that you inspect the bike carefully and test it out before you buy it!

[Edit]What size bike do I need for my height?

  1. Sit on the bike to see if it’s comfortable and sized appropriately. There are all kinds of sizing methods and tricks out there when it comes to figuring out if a bike is the right size for you. You can look at tube measurements and subjective size recommendations all you’d like, but so long as the bike is comfortable for you, it’s totally fine.[7] If you can keep a neutral spine and your knees are almost perfectly straight at the lowest pedal position, it’ll work for you.[8]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 7 Version 3.jpg
    • If you want to use a more scientific sizing method, you can! Here are the general recommendations for bike sizes based on your height (the bike size is the distance from the seat post to the crank):[9]
      • 4'11" to 5'3" –
      • 5'3" to 5'7" –
      • 5'7" to 5'11" –
      • 6'0" to 6'2" –
      • 6'2" to 6'4" –
      • 6'4" or taller" – or more
  2. Take a test drive to determine if the bike feels smooth. Once you find a bike that you think might be right for you, take it for a quick test run. Bike around the block, or in the parking lot of the bike shop. If everything feels smooth and you don’t find pedaling uncomfortable, it’s probably a solid bike for you![10]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 8 Version 3.jpg
    • Different riders prefer different things in a bike. A large part of this process is simply determining how a bike feels to you. If you aren’t comfortable on a given bike, don’t buy it. If you’re comfortable, it’s worth considering!

[Edit]How much is it to buy a bike?

  1. A new bike is probably going to start around $300-500. Road bikes typically start around the $300 mark, while a new mountain bike is going to start around $500—at least if you’re buying a quality bike. There are bikes that are cheaper than this, but they may not last as long.[11]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 9 Version 3.jpg
  2. A high end bike may cost up to $2,000, or more. The really fancy bikes on the market tend to be extremely expensive.[12] Unless you’re a seasoned cyclist or you plan on entering races in the future, it’s usually not necessary to buy an expensive bike like this.[13]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 10 Version 2.jpg
  3. Used bike prices vary, but they may require more maintenance. If you opt for a used bike, it may require a few adjustments and repairs. You may need a new chain, a fresh saddle, and some new grip tape. You’re probably going to need a tune up relatively soon as well. Take these minor repairs into account when you’re buying a used bike, and assume you’ll end up spending a few hundred on this stuff.[14]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 11 Version 3.jpg

[Edit]Where should I buy a bike?

  1. Most cycling enthusiasts suggest you buy in-person from a bike shop. The folks who work at bike shops are passionate and knowledgeable, and they’ll be able to advise you on what kind of bike is likely best for you. They’ll also be able to tune or adjust your bike before it leaves the shop so that you have something road-ready as soon as you walk out of the door! Regardless, if you don’t see the bike in person, there’s no way to know if it’s right for you.[15]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 12 Version 3.jpg
    • If you don’t live anywhere near a bike shop, check your local outdoors or big box department store. These big retailers often have bikes for sale.
  2. Consider buying online if you want a specific model or bike. Local bike shops can only offer what they’ve got on hand, and if you know exactly what you’re looking for, they may not have it in stock. If you’ve got your eyes set on a specific brand, model, or set of features, buying online may be your best option. The big downside is that you won’t get to test the bike, but if you do your research and know what you want, that may not matter to you.[16]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 13 Version 3.jpg
    • Most online bike stores have a live chat feature. If you do buy from an online retailer, reach out through the chat function first. Let them know how tall you are, and what you want in a bike. They’ll be able to give you concrete recommendations regarding the size you likely need.[17]
    • This is also a good option if nothing catches your eye at the local bike shop but you have a solid sense for what you’re looking for.
  3. Consider buying a used bike from a private seller to save money. If you want to buy from a private seller who lives in your area, that’s totally fine! You may not want to exchange money before you inspect it in person though, so try to meet in person to get a look at the bike. Keep in mind, since you can only go see one bike at a time, it may take you a long time to find a bike that’s right for you if you go this route.[18]
    Buy a Bicycle Step 14 Version 3.jpg
    • Ask the seller how long they’ve had it, why they’re getting rid of it, and what repairs it has needed in the past. If they get kind of twitchy or uncomfortable with the questions, just walk away.

[Edit]Tips

  • If you’re short on storage space, consider buying a folding bike. As the name suggests, these can be folded up to make the bike easier to carry and store. They aren’t especially fast, but they get the job done if you don’t want a giant bike taking up tons of space in your apartment![19]

[Edit]Related wikiHows

[Edit]References

[Edit]Related wikiHows

[Edit]Quick Summary


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